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Rank Adv. Procedure

IMPORTANT!  All scouts must follow this procedure when ready to advance in rank


Before you start the rank advancement process:
Check that you have signoff in your scout handbook for all rank requirements.
Check that you have met your service hour requirement and that it is recorded in your scout handbook. See "The Service Hour Requirement" below.
Check that you have met the activity participation requirement and that it is recorded in your scout handbook. See "The Activity Participation Requirement" below.
Check with the Scoutmaster that he is satisfied you have been active in the troop. See "Being Active" below.


Rank Advancement Procedure
 
Step 1: Apply for Rank Advancement 
Once you believe that you have met all the requirements for a rank, go to the Advancement Chairperson (Mrs. Wall) and politely let her know that you are ready to advance to the next rank. Mrs. Wall will provide you with the Rank Advancement Form. Your first step is to neatly fill out information at the top of the form.
 
Step 2: Patrol Leaders Certification 
Ask your patrol leader to sign this section of the Rank Advancement Form. Your Patrol Leader's signature indicates that he is aware that you are advancing. It also allows your Patrol Leader to update any patrol records.
 
Step 3: Records Check
Take your Rank Advancement Form and your Scout Handbook back to the Advancement Chairperson for a records check. The Advancement Chairperson will check your records for attendance, service hours, number of overnights, and level of participation in troop activities. Service hours are an important part of this check. The Troop Advancement Chair will only sign this section of your form if you have completely and properly recorded your required service hours in the back of your Scout handbook.
 
Step 4: Requirements Check
You know the requirements for a rank and you must have completed them or you would not have started this rank advancement process. However, the Advancement Chairperson will give this a thorough review and if all requirements for the rank you are advancing to are completed, the Advancement Chairperson will sign this section of your form 
 
Step 5: Scoutmaster Conference
Take your Rank Advancement Form to the Scoutmaster and politely inform him that you are ready for a Scoutmaster Conference. At this point the Advancement Chair has already verified that you have met all the requirements for the rank for which you are applying so the Scoutmaster will not verify all that again. The purpose of the Scoutmaster Conference is to provide an opportunity for you and the Scoutmaster to have a conversation. The Scoutmaster will be able to better identify your scouting interests including potential leadership roles. It is also an opportunity for you to provide feedback to the Scoutmaster on your scouting experience so far. At the end of your Scoutmaster Conference, the Scoutmaster will sign this section of the form.
 
Step 6: Board of Review
Take your Rank Advancement Form to the Board of Review Chairperson (Mr. Bird) and politely inform him that you are ready for a Board of Review. The Board of Review Chairperson will explain to you that he will coordinate a day and time for your review. He will also remind you that you must wear your Class A uniform, look clean and neat in appearance, and have your Scout Handbook with you. The Board of Review Chairperson should take your Rank Advancement Form at that time. On your scheduled review date, come ready for a conversation with the members of the board. The review typically lasts between 20 and 30 minutes.  After the Board of Review is completed, you are considered "advanced". The Board of Review Chairperson will submit the completed Advancement Form to the Advancement Chairperson who will record your achievement. 
 

The Service Hour Requirement

Page 84 of the Boy Scout Handbook states:  “A service project is a special Good Turn that puts Scout spirit into action. Projects can take many forms. You might take part in a community cleanup; repair a place of worship, a museum, or the home of an elderly person; improve a wildlife habitat; volunteer at a hospital or with a public safety group; organize a recycling effort; or conduct a clothing pickup or food drive.” 
Service hours are not restricted to only troop-sponsored events or projects.  Service hours are also not cumulative. In other words, an hour of service used for Tenderfoot only counts toward Tenderfoot and can't be applied for Second Class.

Here's the official language for each rank regarding the service hour requirement:
Tenderfoot, requirement 7b: One hour of service
Participate in a total of one hour of service in one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout slogan and Scout motto.
 
Second Class, requirement 8e: Two hours of service
Participate in two hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Tell how your service to others relates to the Scout Oath.
 
First Class, requirement 9d: Three hours of service
Participate in three hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. The project(s) must not be the same service project(s) used for Tenderfoot requirement 7b and Second Class requirement 8e. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout Law.
 
Star, requirement 4: Six hours of service
While a First Class Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster.  
 
Life, requirement 4: Six hours of service, at least three of which are conservation
While a Star Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. At least three hours of this service must be conservation-related.

Eagle Scout: The Eagle Scout service project
While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community. (The project must benefit an organization other than the Boy Scouts of America.)


The Activity Participation Requirement

Participating in activities that the troop offers helps Scouts to remain active in their troop. Camping activities allow Scouts to enjoy the outdoors. It is in the outdoor setting that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with one another. Additionally, the skills and activities practiced
in troop meetings come alive in the outdoors. For these reasons, all rank advancement includes an activity participation requirement. 
 
Here's the official language for each rank regarding the camping requirements:
 
Tenderfoot, requirement 1b:
Spend at least one night on a patrol or troop campout. Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch.
 
Second Class, requirement 1a:
Since joining, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, three of which include overnight camping. On at least two of the three campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch
 
First Class, requirement 1a:
Since joining, participate in 10 separate troop/patrol activities, six of which include overnight camping.
On at least five of the six campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch
 
Star, Life, Eagle Scout:
There is no camping requirement for these ranks because the camping merit badge is Eagle required and will require that the Scout attend campouts to fulfill the requirements for the badge.



The "Being Active" Requirement

To earn the top three ranks (Star, Life, Eagle) a Scout must be "active” in his troop and patrol for a specified number of months and “serve actively” in a position of responsibility. For the troop as a whole the "being active" requirement is important because the troop can best achieve it's mission (character development, citizenship training, and personal and mental fitness) when Scouts participate in meetings, outings, and service projects, and hold positions of responsibility.

A standard for attendance is set to 75% of meetings and outings. This is a reasonable standard and recognizes the many worthwhile opportunities beyond Scouting. It is important for the scout to understand that certain leadership positions require a higher level of active participation, such as Senior Patrol Leader. A Scout who falls short of the standard will be given the chance to offer an acceptable explanation. Medical, educational, family, and other issues may prevent higher levels of participation. If a Scout would have been more active if he could have been, then he is deemed active. A board of review should also provide the Scout an opportunity to demonstrate how non-Scouting activities have contributed to his growth. This option is only available if the board of review members can agree that the Scout has already exhibited Scouting values. For example, he might have missed a campout to attend a church youth retreat. The advancement program isn’t about what a Scout has done; it’s about what he’s able to do and how he has grown.

Expectations such as uniform compliance, payment of dues, and parental involvement are not considered when evaluating the “being active” requirement. Also, active participation does not have to be continuous.  A Scout may piece together any periods he has been active and still meet the active requirement. And his active months don’t expire if they are followed by inactive months.

Leadership - All leadership positions are attached with performance standards. Performance standards are important because it is a disservice to the Scout and the unit to reward work that hasn’t been done. Holding a position and doing nothing is obviously unacceptable. If a Scout is not meeting expectations, the Scoutmaster will offer him direction, coaching, and support. If nothing helps to improve his performance, the Scoutmaster will remove him from his position. The Scoutmaster will not surprise the Scout by telling him at the end of his term that his performance has been unsatisfactory and doesn’t count. More than one leadership position can count toward a single rank. However, holding positions simultaneously doesn’t reduce the number of months required. Refer to the Leadership Positions section of this website to understand and apply for positions of leadership.

Here's the official language of "being active" for rank advancement:
Star, requirement 1:
Be active in your troop for at least four months as a First Class Scout. 
While a First Class Scout, serve actively in your troop for four months in a position of responsibility.
Life, requirement 1:
Be active in your troop for at least six months as a Star Scout.
While a Star Scout, serve actively in your troop for six months in a position of responsibility.
Eagle Scout, requirement 1:
Be active in your troop for at least six months as a Life Scout.
While a Life Scout, serve actively in your troop for six months in a position of responsibility.